Installing Playground Equipment in the Accra, Ghana, Area

At the Accra airport, I was met by a friend of a friend, Paul G.  His family was nice enough to offer me board and room during my short stay in Ghana.

Paul had selected 3 locations to install playgrounds and had started fabrication on the equipment.  This meant we could hit the ground running.  As with all installations, a certain amount of field engineering was required.

Our first installation was at the Madina LDS Stake Center.  There we hired 2 church members to assist. We partially assembled some equipment and dug holes for the concrete.

Leveling the Monkey Bars at the Stake Center

At the second location, Ayi Mensah Basic School, we were able to complete the installation in one day, including the placing of concrete to anchor the playground equipment.  We installed:  a swing set, 2 monkey-bar sets, a tire climbing tower, and a tetherball pole.

Two Monkey Bar Sets, Swing Set, and Tetherball Pole at Ayi Mensah School

Installing Two-Tiered Tire Climbing Tower

The next day, we returned to the Stake Center to finish their playground.  We assembled the climbing tower and placed concrete.  The completed playground has:  a swing set, a monkey-bar set, a tire-climbing tower, and a tetherball pole.

Installing a Tire Climbing Tower, with Swing Set and Monkey Bars in the Background

Children at Stake Center Enjoying the Tire Climber

Children Testing the Swing Set During Stake Party

Lastly, we installed a swing set at Julce’s Montessori School located in East Legon.  The school is for children aged 6 months to 5 years.  So we are making some design changes and won’t get it fully completed until August when we will get additional parts.

Installing Swing Set at Montessori Nursery School near Accra

One fun part of the activity:  the neighborhood children helped with the installation work.  They helped level the equipment, and helped assemble and move the tire-climbing tower.  And, of course, they helped test all the playground equipment.

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