Inexpensive, Semi-permanent Housing for Developing Countries

According to a recent article in Time magazine (7 Jul 2014):

“So many people don’t own the land they’re living on,” say veteran architect Doug Sharp of the millions living around the world squatting in informal settlements like refugee camps.  They don’t build permanent living spaces partly because they know they may eventually be displaced.  But what it their homes could go with them?

Such was the thought process behind the Abod (pronounced Adobe), a versatile housing structure that Sharp conceived for people who can’t afford to settle.  It’s sturdy and affordable (one unit costs $2,400, though some of that may be subsidized), and can be constructed in one day.  Sharp has constructed 20 Abods in Limpopo, South Africa.

Abod Homes in South Africa

Abod Homes in South Africa

The homes are currently manufactured in Bondurant, Iowa and in South Africa, and can be shipped anywhere in the world.  The weight of one home is approximately 3,000 lbs.

Inside an Abod Unit:  The Loft Can be Used for a Two-person Bed.

Inside an Abod Unit: The Loft Can be Used for a Two-person Bed.

Unfortunately, Abod’s are not recommended for colder climates.  There is very little that can be done to insulate because of the materials that are used.

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This entry was posted in Engineers Without Borders, Housing, Social Justice, uganda. Bookmark the permalink.

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